Jul. 6th, 2017

bloodygranuaile: (plague)
 I've been a big Laini Taylor fan since Faeries of Dreamdark: Blackbringer first came out, so I was pretty stoked when BSpec picked her latest novel, Strange the Dreamer, as the next book for our book club.
 
It's an extremely Laini Taylor sort of book, lush and sprawling and whimsical and sweet and violent all at the same time, a bit overwritten in the very best way. The title character is Lazlo Strange, an orphan who is raised in misery and deprivation by monks until he is drafted by a library, where he lives a less miserable but still pretty ascetic (except for the books) life as an apprentice and then a junior librarian.
 
Lazlo is obsessed with legends of the lost city of Weep, which is not actually named Weep, but its name vanished from memory when Lazlo was young and he wants to find out what happened to it. Being a junior librarian is a great way for him to become basically the world's foremost unofficial expert on Weep, but it doesn't give him any sort of plan for figuring out what happened to it. But one day an envoy from Weep just shows up out of nowhere like WE NEED FOREIGN EXPERTS TO HELP US SOLVE A PROBLEM, and Lazlo talks his way into joining the party because he speaks their language. A douchebag alchemist who is about Lazlo's age also joins the party; his name is Thyon Nero and he is very rich and talented and pretty and thoroughly awful, although that is not entirely his fault.
 
I'm extremely hesitant to talk about the plot here, especially since I need to do some more deep thinking about trauma and responsibility and the children who live up in the Citadel, but suffice it to say that I'm looking forward to the discussion. The book deals with some very heavy stuff, genocide and generational trauma and tribalism, and power, and loyalty, and vengeance, and dehumanization. Minya is a heartbreakingly awful character.
 
I love Taylor's obsessions with inordinately powerful beings full of extremely human feelings -- there are definitely things in this book that make you say "Yes, this is definitely the same author as Daughter of Smoke and Bone," but it's not too derivative -- much more like if you liked DoSaB, you'll probably also like this. The power of books and myths and storytelling generally are also much in evidence -- indeed, the whole thing is a paean to the importance of love and imagination as necessary correctives to all the horror in the world.
 
It's also a pure wish-fulfillment power fantasy for introverted nerds who love books. Like, a lot. The power fantasiest power fantasy in the history of power fantasies. I want to save the world and be a hero with my giant collection of useless trivia gleaned from years of reading fairy tales! It is ALL I HAVE EVER WANTED. The real world is not fair.

Profile

bloodygranuaile: (Default)
bloodygranuaile

September 2017

S M T W T F S
     1 2
3456789
10 11121314 1516
1718 1920212223
24252627282930

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 22nd, 2017 06:50 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios